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Commanding Business

The challenge with growth is that the habits that got you here become the limitations that prevent you from getting there. Growth not only requires us to learn new habits. It requires that we unlearn old ones. I’m Tim Hamilton, CEO of Praxent and host of the Commanding Business podcast. Each week, I interview authors, experts and real world leaders about how they grew their teams, their organizations and ultimately themselves. From leadership to management and marketing to innovation, we’ll cover a variety of topics with an aim to uncover actionable takeaways you can implement in your own organization today.
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Now displaying: December, 2016
Dec 28, 2016

Service design thinking is the designing and marketing of services that improve the customer experience, and the interactions between the service providers and the customers. We interview Marc Stickdorn, consultant, speaker and author of This Is Service Design Thinking. 

Key Takeaways:

[1:03] The big idea behind This Is Service Design Thinking.

[3:47] How the linear approach can waste two years of your life.

[8:01] Silos make an organization easy to manage, but this creates friction.

[11:10] The classic trap of change management.

[12:43] Adapt the process to the existing culture in small increments.

[16:20] Fail early. Fail safe. Fail cheap.

[17:54] Effective ways of prototyping and market testing.

[24:45] A “Service Safari” requires management to use their product and sell it.

[26:41] Becoming a customer-centric organization.

[28:21] This Is Service Design Doing is a more experienced approach to integrating service design.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

More Than Metrics

This is Service Design Thinking, by Marc Stickdorn

This is Service Design Doing, by Marc Stickdorn

Praxent

@PraxentSoftware on Twitter

Dec 21, 2016

In The Customer Funded Business, best-selling author John Mullins uncovers five novel approaches that scrappy and innovative 21st century entrepreneurs working in companies large and small have ingeniously adapted from their predecessors like Dell, Gates, and the Zieglers. John Mullins is an Associate Professor of Management Practice at the London Business School and a worldwide speaker and educator. He is a regularly published author at Harvard Business Review and MIT Sloan Management Review.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:05] The big idea behind The Customer-Funded Business book.

[3:30] Raising capital is a huge distraction. There is a better way.

[6:57] Does Venture Capital funding ever make sense?

[9:55] Three out of four VC-funded companies fail to return the capital that goes into them.

[12:26] The pay-in-advance and subscription models allow entrepreneurs to collect a customer’s money before delivering the product.

[16:54] The scarcity-based model uses a limited time offer to lure an immediate purchase.

[23:49] The key to a successful service-to-product model is segregating the two offerings.

[30:40] Airbnb is a good example of the Matchmaker model.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Customer-Funded Business: Start, Finance, or Grow Your Business with Your Customers' Cash, by John Mullins, Ph.D.

How to Finance and Grow Your Startup Without VC

Built to Sell

Praxent

@PraxentSoftware on Twitter

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